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Plant Power Investing

Evidence increases by the day that more consumers are moving towards a plant-based diet. How can the average investor take advantage of this trend?

Low-cost index investing has become a popular approach to achieve market returns and will continue to be used by more individual and institutional investors. On the other hand, sustainable investing is also a growing trend, as more investors recognize that an “all-of-the-above” index investing strategy conflicts with their worldview. Index investors are accepting the status quo by owning companies as they are. Sustainable investors are driving change by using fund managers who engage with companies to adopt positive changes or by simple divestment (i.e. avoid investment in the company or sector).

I envision three groups of individuals who would find plant power investing attractive – vegans, vegetarians and advocates of a healthy eating / living lifestyle (ironically, HE/LL for short). The majority of individuals in this category, however, are not in a position to take on an extraordinary amount of investment risk. Investing in “pure play” meat or egg substitute start-up companies is beyond their financial reach.

The growth in the number of mutual funds that divest from fossil fuels provides an example that plant-based investors might want to follow. Why not simply avoid companies that are in obvious conflict with your worldview? Truth is, there are sufficient large, established companies to choose from in order to develop an investment portfolio that may satisfy both financial and personal goals.

As I point out in my book, Low Fee Vegan Investing, there are currently no mutual funds targeted to plant-based investors. This is unfortunate since, without this option, most investors are not in a position to take on the effort or cost to implement a strategy that would otherwise meet their needs.

I believe there are two easy steps plant-centered investors can take to encourage the development of a suitable investment tool (e.g., mutual fund, plant-based index fund). The first step would be to contact their investment professional and state an interest in having a portfolio which reflects their worldview.

If sufficient demand develops, this will be noticed by financial service providers (again, recall what happened with fossil fuel divestment – many mutual funds and ETFs options were developed in a fairly short amount of time). Second, participate in the short “Plant Power Survey” that I developed to start counting the number of plant-based investors interested in this concept and, equally importantly, develop a consumer preference data set that might help the community of portfolio managers generate a set of filters for use until investor demand warrants the expense of more rigorous research.